1. Introduction
1.1 We are committed to safeguarding the privacy of our website visitors and service users.
1.2 This policy applies where we are acting as a data controller with respect to the personal data of our website visitors and service users; in other words, where we determine the purposes and means of the processing of that personal data.
1.3 We use cookies on our website. Insofar as those cookies are not strictly necessary for the provision of our website and services, we will ask you to consent to our use of cookies when you first visit our website.
1.4 Our website incorporates privacy controls which affect how we will process your personal data. By using the privacy controls, you can specify whether you would like to receive direct marketing communications and limit the publication of your information. You can access the privacy controls via http://www.togetherwithfamilies.co.uk/2-school-family-facilitation/24-privacy-policy-and-cookies-management.
1.5 In this policy, "we", "us" and "our" refer to Together With Families . For more information about us, see Section 10.

2. How we use your personal data
2.1 In this Section 2 we have set out:
(a) the general categories of personal data that we may process;
(b) in the case of personal data that we did not obtain directly from you, the source and specific categories of that data;
(c) the purposes for which we may process personal data; and
(d) the legal bases of the processing.
2.2 We may process data about your use of our website and services ("usage data"). The usage data may include your IP address, geographical location, browser type and version, operating system, referral source, length of visit, page views and website navigation paths, as well as information about the timing, frequency and pattern of your service use. The source of the usage data is our analytics tracking system. This usage data may be processed for the purposes of analysing the use of the website and services. The legal basis for this processing is our legitimate interests, namely monitoring and improving our website and services.
2.3 We may process information contained in any enquiry you submit to us regarding goods and/or services ("enquiry data"). The enquiry data may be processed for the purposes of offering, marketing and selling relevant goods and/or services to you. The legal basis for this processing is consent.
2.4 We may process information relating to transactions, including purchases of goods and services, that you enter into with us and/or through our website ("transaction data"). The transaction data may include your contact details, your card details and the transaction details. The transaction data may be processed for the purpose of supplying the purchased goods and services and keeping proper records of those transactions. The legal basis for this processing is the performance of a contract between you and us and/or taking steps, at your request, to enter into such a contract and our legitimate interests, namely the proper administration of our website and business.
2.5 We may process information that you provide to us for the purpose of subscribing to our email notifications and/or newsletters ("notification data"). The notification data may be processed for the purposes of sending you the relevant notifications and/or newsletters. The legal basis for this processing is consent.
2.6 We may process information contained in or relating to any communication that you send to us ("correspondence data"). The correspondence data may include the communication content and metadata associated with the communication. Our website will generate the metadata associated with communications made using the website contact forms. The correspondence data may be processed for the purposes of communicating with you and record-keeping. The legal basis for this processing is our legitimate interests, namely the proper administration of our website and business and communications with users.
2.7 We may process any of your personal data identified in this policy where necessary for the establishment, exercise or defence of legal claims, whether in court proceedings or in an administrative or out-of-court procedure. The legal basis for this processing is our legitimate interests, namely the protection and assertion of our legal rights, your legal rights and the legal rights of others.
2.8 We may process any of your personal data identified in this policy where necessary for the purposes of obtaining or maintaining insurance coverage, managing risks, or obtaining professional advice. The legal basis for this processing is our legitimate interests, namely the proper protection of our business against risks.
2.9 In addition to the specific purposes for which we may process your personal data set out in this Section 2, we may also process any of your personal data where such processing is necessary for compliance with a legal obligation to which we are subject, or in order to protect your vital interests or the vital interests of another natural person.
2.10 Please do not supply any other person's personal data to us, unless we prompt you to do so.

3. Providing your personal data to others
3.1 We may disclose your personal data to our insurers and/or professional advisers insofar as reasonably necessary for the purposes of obtaining or maintaining insurance coverage, managing risks, obtaining professional advice, or the establishment, exercise or defence of legal claims, whether in court proceedings or in an administrative or out-of-court procedure.
3.2 In addition to the specific disclosures of personal data set out in this Section 3, we may disclose your personal data where such disclosure is necessary for compliance with a legal obligation to which we are subject, or in order to protect your vital interests or the vital interests of another natural person. We may also disclose your personal data where such disclosure is necessary for the establishment, exercise or defence of legal claims, whether in court proceedings or in an administrative or out-of-court procedure.

4. Retaining and deleting personal data
4.1 This Section 4 sets out our data retention policies and procedure, which are designed to help ensure that we comply with our legal obligations in relation to the retention and deletion of personal data.
4.2 Personal data that we process for any purpose or purposes shall not be kept for longer than is necessary for that purpose or those purposes.
4.3 We will retain your personal data as follows:
(a) transaction data will be retained for a minimum period of 12 months following your enquiry, and for a maximum period of 6 years following your enquiry.
4.4 In some cases it is not possible for us to specify in advance the periods for which your personal data will be retained. In such cases, we will determine the period of retention based on the following criteria:
(a) the period of retention of all data will be determined based on our need to maintain a line of communication with you.
4.5 Notwithstanding the other provisions of this Section 4, we may retain your personal data where such retention is necessary for compliance with a legal obligation to which we are subject, or in order to protect your vital interests or the vital interests of another natural person.

5. Amendments
5.1 We may update this policy from time to time by publishing a new version on our website.
5.2 You should check this page occasionally to ensure you are happy with any changes to this policy.
5.3 We may notify you of significant changes to this policy by email or through the private messaging system on our website.

6. Your rights
6.1 In this Section 6, we have summarised the rights that you have under data protection law. Some of the rights are complex, and not all of the details have been included in our summaries. Accordingly, you should read the relevant laws and guidance from the regulatory authorities for a full explanation of these rights.
6.2 Your principal rights under data protection law are:
(a) the right to access;
(b) the right to rectification;
(c) the right to erasure;
(d) the right to restrict processing;
(e) the right to object to processing;
(f) the right to data portability;
(g) the right to complain to a supervisory authority; and
(h) the right to withdraw consent.
6.3 You have the right to confirmation as to whether or not we process your personal data and, where we do, access to the personal data, together with certain additional information. That additional information includes details of the purposes of the processing, the categories of personal data concerned and the recipients of the personal data. Providing the rights and freedoms of others are not affected, we will supply to you a copy of your personal data. The first copy will be provided free of charge, but additional copies may be subject to a reasonable fee.
6.4 You have the right to have any inaccurate personal data about you rectified and, taking into account the purposes of the processing, to have any incomplete personal data about you completed.
6.5 In some circumstances you have the right to the erasure of your personal data without undue delay. Those circumstances include: the personal data are no longer necessary in relation to the purposes for which they were collected or otherwise processed; you withdraw consent to consent-based processing; you object to the processing under certain rules of applicable data protection law; the processing is for direct marketing purposes; and the personal data have been unlawfully processed. However, there are exclusions of the right to erasure. The general exclusions include where processing is necessary: for exercising the right of freedom of expression and information; for compliance with a legal obligation; or for the establishment, exercise or defence of legal claims.
6.6 In some circumstances you have the right to restrict the processing of your personal data. Those circumstances are: you contest the accuracy of the personal data; processing is unlawful but you oppose erasure; we no longer need the personal data for the purposes of our processing, but you require personal data for the establishment, exercise or defence of legal claims; and you have objected to processing, pending the verification of that objection. Where processing has been restricted on this basis, we may continue to store your personal data. However, we will only otherwise process it: with your consent; for the establishment, exercise or defence of legal claims; for the protection of the rights of another natural or legal person; or for reasons of important public interest.
6.7 You have the right to object to our processing of your personal data on grounds relating to your particular situation, but only to the extent that the legal basis for the processing is that the processing is necessary for: the performance of a task carried out in the public interest or in the exercise of any official authority vested in us; or the purposes of the legitimate interests pursued by us or by a third party. If you make such an objection, we will cease to process the personal information unless we can demonstrate compelling legitimate grounds for the processing which override your interests, rights and freedoms, or the processing is for the establishment, exercise or defence of legal claims.
6.8 You have the right to object to our processing of your personal data for direct marketing purposes (including profiling for direct marketing purposes). If you make such an objection, we will cease to process your personal data for this purpose.
6.9 You have the right to object to our processing of your personal data for scientific or historical research purposes or statistical purposes on grounds relating to your particular situation, unless the processing is necessary for the performance of a task carried out for reasons of public interest.
6.10 To the extent that the legal basis for our processing of your personal data is:
(a) consent; or
(b) that the processing is necessary for the performance of a contract to which you are party or in order to take steps at your request prior to entering into a contract,
and such processing is carried out by automated means, you have the right to receive your personal data from us in a structured, commonly used and machine-readable format. However, this right does not apply where it would adversely affect the rights and freedoms of others.
6.11 If you consider that our processing of your personal information infringes data protection laws, you have a legal right to lodge a complaint with a supervisory authority responsible for data protection. You may do so in the EU member state of your habitual residence, your place of work or the place of the alleged infringement.
6.12 To the extent that the legal basis for our processing of your personal information is consent, you have the right to withdraw that consent at any time. Withdrawal will not affect the lawfulness of processing before the withdrawal.
6.13 You may exercise any of your rights in relation to your personal data by written notice to us, in addition to the other methods specified in this Section 6.

7. About cookies
7.1 A cookie is a file containing an identifier (a string of letters and numbers) that is sent by a web server to a web browser and is stored by the browser. The identifier is then sent back to the server each time the browser requests a page from the server.
7.2 Cookies may be either "persistent" cookies or "session" cookies: a persistent cookie will be stored by a web browser and will remain valid until its set expiry date, unless deleted by the user before the expiry date; a session cookie, on the other hand, will expire at the end of the user session, when the web browser is closed.
7.3 Cookies do not typically contain any information that personally identifies a user, but personal information that we store about you may be linked to the information stored in and obtained from cookies.

8. Cookies that we use
8.1 We use cookies for the following purposes:
(a) authentication - we use cookies to identify you when you visit our website and as you navigate our website;
(b) analysis - we use cookies to help us to analyse the use and performance of our website and services; and
(c) cookie consent - we use cookies to store your preferences in relation to the use of cookies more generally.

9. Managing cookies
9.1 Most browsers allow you to refuse to accept cookies and to delete cookies. The methods for doing so vary from browser to browser, and from version to version. You can however obtain up-to-date information about blocking and deleting cookies via these links:
(a) https://support.google.com/chrome/answer/95647?hl=en (Chrome);
(b) https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/enable-and-disable-cookies-website-preferences (Firefox);
(c) http://www.opera.com/help/tutorials/security/cookies/ (Opera);
(d) https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/help/17442/windows-internet-explorer-delete-manage-cookies (Internet Explorer);
(e) https://support.apple.com/kb/PH21411 (Safari); and
(f) https://privacy.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-10-microsoft-edge-and-privacy (Edge).
9.2 Blocking all cookies will have a negative impact upon the usability of many websites.
9.3 If you block cookies, you will not be able to use all the features on our website.

The cookies on this website are disabled.
This decision can be reversed anytime by clicking the below button "Allow Cookies".

10. Our details
10.1 This website is owned and operated by Together With Families.
10.2 Our principal place of business is at 51 Queen Street, Waingroves, Ripley, DE5 9TJ.
10.3 You can contact us:
(a) by post, to the postal address given above;
(b) by telephone, on the contact number published on our website from time to time; or
(c) by email, using the email address published on our website from time to time.

News Feed

I'm Broken Inside (Panorama BBC 11th April 2016) was heartbreaking to watch, seeing how young people needing mental health support are so badly let down in our country by a health care system which is ill-equipped to meet their needs. And the number of children who need support in the UK is greater than ever.

One statistic that stood out for me is that the number of children and young people suffering with depression has doubled since the 1980s. It set me wondering why - what has changed in that time that would make this happen? There are many things, of course - changes in family demographics; the ever-growing tide of technology which absorbs our attention and leaves children and young people more socially isolated than ever, as well as more vulnerable to bullying; the reduction in the amount of time children spend outside because of perceived safety risks... But I believe one of the key changes has been in our education system.

When I trained as a primary school teacher in the 1980s the emphasis was on the child as the focus of the learning process - the 'child-centred learning' which became popular 20 years earlier. It was an approach that valued each person and stressed their individual strengths, learning needs and styles, with a perception that each child should be enabled to achieve his or her potential. It wasn't perfect and had many critics, but it did recognise the child as unique and place them at the heart of what happened in the classroom.

Since the introduction of the National Curriculum in 1988, the emphasis has gradually shifted - often despite the best efforts of teachers - to put the curriculum and not the child at the centre of the learning process. What you know, rather than how you learn, is what matters - and multiple tests throughout primary school and beyond reinforce that message to children. They are constantly having to strive to meet targets and expectations, and too often living with a fear of failure, and being made aware of that from an early age.
As confident adults secure in our self-worth we might cope with that (although not all of us would); but what impact does a system which applies such pressure and so often reinforces a sense of failing have on the self-image and self-esteem of children and teenagers?

A depressing thought...

When talking to parents I sometimes tell the story of how clumsy I was as a child. If there was something to trip over or walk into, I would be the one to do it. I was one of those kids with everlasting scabs on knees and perpetually purple shins. I couldn't catch a ball to save my life (my brother says), and I was always dropping things - I still remember being chosen to serve dinner to a group of young teachers who had come for interview at my school, and tipping a plate full of fish and chips onto the best suit of one of the hopeful candidates.

Not surprisingly, I frequently heard the words 'you're so clumsy'. And as young children do, I believed them...so much so that it took me until I was nearly 40 to stop falling over! The belief that I was clumsy was instilled in me from an early age, and I lived up to it. Such is the power of words.

As parents, we need to think about what we want our children to believe about themselves. If a child repeatedly hears parents and others say 'he's a tearaway', or 'she just can't sit still', this will become their internal monologue, and they will believe themselves to be that person. If, on the other hand, parents note and comment on the good things they see in their child ('you're waiting so patiently'; 'you are so polite') then this is the image a child will build of himself, and the one he will live up to.

The power is in our words!

As the evidence base for Video Interaction Guidance grows, it is pleasing to see it now appearing as a recommended intervention in a number of publications from the National Institute for Helath and Care Excellence (NICE).

The NICE guidelines on Social and Emotional Wellbeing in the Early Years (2012) recommend the use of VIG in supporting the development of healthy attachment between parents or carers and infants or young children, which in turn promotes wellbeing and resilience in the child. It is unsurprising, therefore, that the recent NICE guidelines on Children's Attachment (2015) - focussing on children adopted from care, in care, or at risk of going into care - also recommend the use of VIG to foster and build attachment with parents or carers, particularly with younger children. I believe that VIG has great potential to help children to develop secure attachments, leading to stable placements, successful adoptions and improved mental wellbeing in children and young people. Even better if we can use it before children reach this critical stage, to support them to stay within their families, by helping parents to develop increased sensitivity and responsiveness, and enabling them to better meet their children's needs.

A blogger on a popular parenting website recently expressed her frustration with people telling her that 'housework can wait'. She protested that jobs have to be done, and children need to learn that and not expect their parents to play with them all the time.

She has a valid point. Of course parents can't - and shouldn't - spend all of their time playing with the children. That would be neither normal nor healthy. Children need to learn to entertain themselves and all of us need some 'me-time' in the midst of our busy lives, as well as ensuring the essential jobs are done.

On the fundamental question of whether housework can wait, however, I believe it can.

The dishes will not multiply if left for half an hour; no one will die if the ironing or dusting is not done until tomorrow; the world will not end if I don't clean the bath today.

What can't wait is that fleeting idea your child wants to share with you, her excitement at the cloud in the sky that looks like Grandad's face, or his wonder at the butterfly that just landed on his shoulder.

I was never a great housework enthusiast, but now my kids have grown up and gone I have no regrets about unwashed floors or smudgy windows. If I regret anything it's that I didn't spend more time with them.

It's probably to be expected that none of my three children has grown up to be house-proud or even particularly tidy. What I have noticed, though, is that in both their personal and professional lives, they all have time for people. And I am proud of them for that!

Testimonials

Really safe, supportive and collaborative in style. Found some key actions/goals to work on through the collaborative process.

Helen, Parent Group Facilitator